2015-01-22

Release Announcement: Quarterly Notes on Sustainable Water Management Q04/2014
Managing the Urban Water Supply

_NEW: follow the development of the new web-presence wolframscharnhorst.blogspot.com








Share



print download: http://bit.ly/185cRt9 Sustainable urban water supply represents a key issue today as well as in the near future. Often networks are out of date, leakage or plugging is a common issue and investments need to be considered very careful. In addition, the behaviour, i.e. the demand of the consumers varies strongly.
The present issue of the Quarterly Notes on Sustainable Water Management (Q04/2014) – Managing the Urban Water Supply - tries to provide an overview of innovative articles addressing the above issues in-depth.
As always, a summary of news about the development of the web-portal is given. In the fifth year of its operation the platform is subject to a thorough re-design. This implies that the former _kt75 | mirror (http://kt75-mirror.blogspot.com/) is now integrated into the large information portal http://wolframscharnhorst.blogspot.com. Via this portal a number of other services will be available in the near future. Definitely, the portal will go live fully functional as of 1st April 2015.

Content:

■ Hedging Supply Risks: An Optimal Urban Water Portfolio ■ An Overview of Hybrid Water Supply Systems in the Context of Urban Water Management: Challenges and Opportunities ■ Assessing the performance of urban water utilities in Mozambique using a water utility performance index ■ Water Supply Network Sectorization Based on Social Networks Community Detection Algorithms ■ Moving Towards Sustainable and Resilient Smart Water Grids ■ Scenario-Based Analysis on Water Resources Implication of Coal Power in Western China  ■ Analysis of the Possible Use of Solar Photovoltaic Energy in Urban Water Supply Systems ■ The Water Demand of Energy: Implications for Sustainable Energy Policy Development ■ Rogun Dam—Path to Energy Independence or Security Threat? ■ Global analysis of urban surface water supply vulnerability ■ Water on an urban planet: Urbanization and the reach of urban water infrastructure ■ Challenges for urban water supply: the case of Masvingo Municipality in Zimbabwe ■ (Book): Integrated Water Cycle Modelling of the Urban/Peri-urban Continuum ■ Investigating Transitions of Centralized Water Infrastructure to Decentralized Solutions – An Integrated Approach ■ Transitioning Towards Urban Water Security in Asia Pacific ■ A political–industrial ecology of water supply infrastructure for Los Angeles ■ The Economics of Groundwater Replenishment for Reliable Urban Water Supply …

Download it now free of Charge from: http://bit.ly/185cRt9 and learn more about urban water supply...  continue to discuss the issues via sustainability2.0: https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/104496231474687499876 and subsribe to the free mirror | first reader: http://goo.gl/2D9xT

// This is a service provided to you by http://wolframscharnhorst.blogspot.com



2015-01-19

Aquifer Recharge: new GIS-solution to provide for sustainable water supply
Japanese Experiences (sci paper).

_NEW: follow the development of the new web-presence wolframscharnhorst.blogspot.com








Share



reprint Vulnerability assessment to delineate areas that are more susceptible to contamination from anthropogenic sources has become an important element for sensible resource management and land use planning. This contribution aims at estimating aquifer vulnerability by applying the DRASTIC model as well as utilizing sensitivity analyses to evaluate the relative importance of the model parameters for aquifer vulnerability in Kakamigahara Heights, Gifu Prefecture central Japan. An additional objective is to demonstrate the combined use of the DRASTIC and geographical information system (GIS) as an effective method for groundwater pollution risk assessment. The DRASTIC model uses seven environmental parameters (Depth to water, net Recharge, Aquifer media, Soil media, Topography, Impact of vadose zone, and hydraulic Conductivity) to characterize the hydrogeological setting and evaluate aquifer vulnerability. The western part of the Kakamigahara aquifer was dominated by high vulnerability classes while the eastern part was characterized by moderate vulnerability classes. The elevated north-eastern part of the study area displayed low aquifer vulnerability. The integrated vulnerability map shows the high risk imposed on the eastern part of the Kakamigahara aquifer due to the high pollution potential of intensive vegetable cultivation. The more vulnerable western part of the aquifer is, however, under a lower contamination risk. In Kakamigahara Heights, land use seems to be a better predictor of groundwater contamination by nitrate. Net recharge parameter inflicted the largest impact on the intrinsic vulnerability of the aquifer followed by soil media, topography, vadose zone media, and hydraulic conductivity.
subscribe to the free mirror-reader here
Sensitivity analyses indicated that the removal of net recharge, soil media and topography causes large variation in vulnerability index. Moreover, net recharge and hydraulic conductivity were found to be more effective in assessing aquifer vulnerability than assumed by the DRASTIC model. The GIS technique has provided efficient environment for analyses and high capabilities of handling large spatial data. Read on... (empowered by wolframscharnhorst.blogspot.com).



2014-12-31

Oops! They did it again
LinkedIN continues to inactivate user accounts

-- a _kt75 | note

_NEW: follow the development of wolframscharnhorst.blogspot.com and explore all _kt75 | publications via the news db... and leave your comments here








Share




Have you also been informed that your LinkedIN account has been inactivated, at least temporarily? Did you also receive an e-mail that told you that "some members accused you to either spam, perform phishing or connecting with people you don't know"? Did the same e-mail ask you to confirm in written that you will adhere to the rules of LinkedIN? If so, you are in good company with many other concerned people. The common procedure is as follows:
  • the account is inactivated without any prior warning
  • the only contact path is directly via some sort of help center of LinkedIN
  • if happened for the second time or more, the individual request for re-activation of the account is processed rather slowly
  • the accusations are as always: spam, phishing or connecting with to many people and the accusations are not documented at all

This rather in-transparent and basically crude way of "coordinating" member behavior in principle must result in a functional loss of the usefulness of social media as such. Essential questions popup like:
  • How does LinkedIN evaluate accusations like spamming, phishing, wrong commenting, etc.? What are the benchmarks?
  • Who actually accuses? More and more one gets the impression that everybody can accuse anybody for doing wrong resulting in the inactivation of the respective member account.
  • What in terms of member participation is actually still allowed? 
  • Isn't it LinkedIN that encourages the members to network (today one simply can connect with almost everybody without indicating any reason like in earlier times)?
  • Isn't it LinkedIN that motivates the members to share comments as much as possible?
All this is basically frustrating and is in principle in contradiction to what social media was before. Though trying to think positive, the impression appears that inactivating member accounts may also be some kind of censorship. In the particular case important information provided by http://kt75-mirror.blogspot.ch/ about sustainable development (with a particular focus on sustainable water management) is suppressed. The publication of the Quarterly Notes on Sustainable Water Management is hindered. And lively debates about sustainable development (including networking) is prevented. Question: is this the aim of social media? Just take into account: there is nothing about marketing a product (which would be spam if its done to often). There is nothing about stealing information (which would be phishing). There is nothing about connecting with to many people and there is nothing about flooding members with information (as posting is done 3 to 5 times a month at its maximum).

Feel invited to reflect about the above, comment it, share it, etc. and follow the further development of a new sustainability page.



2014-11-28

The Magic of 2050: A Tricky Transition From Fossil Fuel -
The Case of Denmark

-- a _kt75 | reprint

_NEW: explore all _kt75 | publications via the news db... and leave your comments here







Share



Denmark, a tiny country on the northern fringe of Europe, is pursuing the world’s most ambitious policy against climate change. It aims to end the burning of fossil fuels in any form by 2050 — not just in electricity production, as some other countries hope to do, but in transportation as well.

Now a question is coming into focus: Can Denmark keep the lights on as it chases that lofty goal?

Let anyone consider such a sweeping transition to be impossible in principle, the Danes beg to differ. They essentially invented the modern wind-power industry, and have pursued it more avidly than any country. They are above 40 percent renewable power on their electric grid, aiming toward 50 percent by 2020. The political consensus here to keep pushing is all but unanimous. Their policy is similar to that of neighboring Germany, which has spent tens of billions pursuing wind and solar power, and is likely to hit 30 percent renewable power on the electric grid this year. But Denmark, at the bleeding edge of global climate policy, is in certain ways the more interesting case. The 5.6 million Danes have pushed harder than the Germans, they have gotten further — and they are reaching the point where the problems with the energy transition can no longer be papered over. The trouble, if it can be called that, is that renewable power sources like wind and solar cost nothing to run, once installed. That is potentially a huge benefit in the long run. But as more of these types of power sources push their way onto the electric grid, they cause power prices to crash at what used to be the most profitable times of day. That can render conventional power plants, operating on gas or coal or uranium, uneconomical to run. Yet those plants are needed to supply backup power for times when the wind is not blowing and the sun is not shining.

With their prime assets throwing off less cash, electricity suppliers in Germany and Denmark are on edge. They have applied to shut down a slew of newly unprofitable power plants, but nervous governments are resisting, afraid of being caught short on some cold winter’s night with little wind. The governments have offered short-term subsidies, knowing that if they force companies to operate these plants at a loss, it will be a matter of time before the companies start going bankrupt. Throughout Europe, governments have come to the realization that electricity markets are going to have to be redesigned for the new age, but they are not pursuing this task with urgency. A bad redesign could itself throw customers into the dark, after all, as happened in California a decade ago. Denmark is geographically lucky. It has strong electrical linkages to neighboring Sweden, with plentiful nuclear power capacity, and Norway, with power available on demand from dams. But Swedish politicians have vowed to shut down the country’s nuclear plants and go renewable, and Norway’s cheap hydroelectric power is in rising demand, with a supply line under consideration to energy-hungry Britain. So the Danish electricity industry sees trouble coming. Read on and download the _kt75 | reflection on sustsinability.

2014-11-25

Hotspot III: 60 percent of the Middle-East wastewater is discharged to Sea
(report)

-- a _kt75 | reprint

_NEW: explore all _kt75 | publications via the news db... and leave your comments here








Share



Approximately 40 to 60 percent of the region’s waste water is discharged into the sea when it could be stored and reused for other purposes, according to ARCADIS’ 2014 Middle East Aquifer Recharge report.“The region should use treated sewage effluent (TSE) as the precious resource it is and stop thinking of it as waste or a useless by-product,” said Titia De Mes, Water for Industry Leader, Middle East at ARCADIS. “TSE can and should be recycled, but this requires a change in thinking from being a choice and a cost to a necessity and investment – the optimal choice for the Middle East is aquifer recharge and recovery.”
The report reveals that merely 60 percent of TSE could be stored in the aquifer and used at a later time through various approaches, highlighting three different methods to aquifer recharge – aquifer storage and recovery; aquifer storage transfer and recovery and aquifer recharge and recovery. The different techniques involve water that is re-injected back into the aquifer for later recovery whether it is used by a single well, stored for a prolonged period and pumped through another well, enabling natural treatment or built with infrastructure or an existing landscape, such as a wadi, to enhance groundwater infiltration, also enabling natural treatment.
Furthermore, the report highlights the key discrepancy of TSE planning and implementation across the GCC countries. Abu Dhabi and Doha are currently pumping excess desalinated water in the aquifer to act as emergency storage whereas other key cities are still in the middle of research for the use of TSE.
De Mes continues, “The outcomes of aquifer recharge are good for countries economically and environmentally – saving costs, reducing the carbon footprint and improving the environment. Whilst the region is progressing, there is still an essential requirement for overcoming constraints – the next step involves engaging the regional water community, government bureaus and ministries and associated industries in a conversation that can lead to implementing rules and regulations.”
The Middle East has a large amount of prospects in the water space, especially when it comes to optimising TSE utilisation.  It is the duty of industry experts to drive environmental change, local development and ultimately create sustainable solutions. Read the entire report... and download the recent issue of the Quarterly Notes on Sustainable Water Management.

2014-11-18

Change: Africa the forthcoming Leader in sustainable Energy Supply?

-- a _kt75 | reprint

_NEW: explore all _kt75 | publications via the news db... and leave your comments here









Share


The ECOWAS Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Status Report, produced collaboratively by REN21 and ECREEE with lead authorship from the Worldwatch Institute, provides a regional perspective on the renewable energy and energy efficiency market and industry development in West Africa.
Launched on November 10, 2014, the report concludes that renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies have rapidly become cost effective solutions for overcoming the diverse energy challenges facing the ECOWAS region (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, Côte d'Ivoire, The Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Togo).
"It is clear that the ECOWAS Member States acknowledge the enormous potential that renewables and energy efficiency bring to accelerating energy access and meeting the region's energy needs," says Christine Lins, Executive Secretary of REN21. "Through their commitment to developing renewable energy and energy efficiency across the region, ECOWAS Member States have taken a proactive role in ensuring their ability to address current energy sector challenges through the uptake of renewables, while simultaneously building a resilient system that prepares the region to effectively meet future energy needs and ensures sustainable energy access for all."
The Executive Director of ECREEE, Mahama Kappiah, says that non-availability of reliable and up-to-date energy information in West African countries constrains opportunities for investments in the energy sector. The ECOWAS Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Status Report is therefore a "tool to make information on these activities in the ECOWAS region readily available to different stakeholders, as well as to local and global investors, developers, and project promoters by showcasing the ECOWAS region as one of the most active regions in Africa for the promotion of renewables and energy efficiency."
"This report presents countries undergoing rapid change, including in the energy sector," says Alexander Ochs, Director of the Worldwatch Institute's Climate and Energy Program. "While we are witnessing important projects throughout the region, most ECOWAS countries are just starting to make use of the enormous renewable energy potentials at their doorsteps-and on their roofs, too. With national policies and regional cooperation just taking shape, the big renewable energy boom in West Africa is yet to come. An economically, socially, and environmentally prosperous Africa can only be built on the foundation of a sustainable energy system."
The ECOWAS Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Status Report, covers recent developments and trends in the energy sector in the ECOWAS region. It uses up-to-date renewable energy data, provided by network of contributors from and around West Africa, and is targeted at policymakers, industry, investors and civil society to enable them to make informed decisions about the diffusion of renewable energy. By design, the report does not provide any analysis or forecasts.

Some Key Findings

As of early 2014, the ECOWAS region had an installed capacity of 39 megawatts (MW) of grid-connected renewable electricity (excluding hydropower). The total installed renewable capacity, including hydro, was 4.8 gigawatts (GW).
Renewable energy technologies account for an estimated 28.8 percent of the region's total installed capacity of grid-connected electricity.
Regional new investment in renewable power and fuels from six leading ECOWAS Member States (Nigeria, Senegal, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Liberia, and Sierra Leone) was USD 29.7 million in 2013, down significantly from the peak of USD 370 million in 2011.
Guinea-Bissau, Ghana, and Sierra Leone are regional leaders in the contribution of renewables to their final energy consumption-at 30.3 percent, 22.4 percent, and 19 percent, respectively, in early 2014-largely as a result of their use of modern biomass. Read on...

2014-11-13

Hot Spot II: Importing Drinking Water
Experiences from the US, South Africa and Australia

-- a _kt75 | reprint

_NEW: explore all _kt75 | publications via the news db... and leave your comments here







Share


Of all the clean water that our cities consume, roughly half of it flows down our sewers to sewage treatment plants where it is treated and released back to the environment. Conventional sewage treatment plants are designed to clean this water to a degree that can be discharged to rivers or the ocean without major environmental or public health impacts. In many parts of the world, sufficient fresh water supplies are increasingly difficult to source. Water stressed cities now import water, pumped over large distances at a considerable energy cost. Los Angeles, for example, imports 8.9bn litres of water a day to meet the city’s needs. Other cities, such as Ashkelon in Israel, are investing in seawater desalination to produce drinkable water. But this process is also highly energy intensive and its application limited to coastal locations. An alternative opportunity is to reclaim the water that we discharge from sewage treatment plants and treat that to a quality suitable for safe human consumption.
Reusing highly treated municipal sewage effluent is not a new idea. It has traditionally been achieved by a process known as indirect potable reuse (IPR). Examples of unplanned IPR exist throughout the world, such as in Adelaide. In such cases, conventional sewage treatment plants discharge effluents to rivers (in Adelaide’s case into the Murray-Darling Rivers), which are then used as drinking water sources for cities downstream. Alternatively, planned IPR usually involves treating the sewage effluents to a very high degree by advanced water treatment processes before releasing the purified water to a lake or groundwater system used for drinking water supply. While planned IPR has been an important water supply strategy for a number of decades, an alternative approach, known as direct potable reuse (DPR) is now rapidly gaining favour in countries including the US, South Africa and Australia. This process refers to taking treated municipal wastewater from a sewage treatment plant and, after further treating it to a level suitable for drinking, re-depositing it directly back into a drinking water distribution system. It differs from IPR by not discharging the water back to an environmental system, such as a river, lake or aquifer, prior to re-extracting and reusing it for drinking water supply. Until very recently, we used to point to the only one DPR scheme in the world, which has been operating in Namibia since 1968. But since 2011, new schemes have come online in the US at Cloudcroft (New Mexico), Big Spring (Texas) and Wichita Falls (Texas).
More significantly, a number of very large Californian cities such as San Diego, Los Angeles and Sacramento are now all actively considering the development of DPR schemes as a major contributor to future water supplies. Major changes to regulation (such as the California Water Code) have been implemented to facilitate these potential projects. This has been accompanied by significant research efforts on the part of the US water industry to address a number of key issues including enhanced treatment process reliability, regulatory requirements and issues related to public perception and acceptance. Read on... and download the latest Quarterly Notes on Sustainable Water Management.

2014-11-07

Chinas Big Blue Challenge - Water

-- a _kt75 | reprint

_NEW: explore all _kt75 | publications via the news db... and leave your comments here




A crisis is developing beneath China’s thirsty farms and cities, but  no one knows its full extent. With about 20% of the world’s population but only about 5–7% of global freshwater resources, China draws heavily on groundwater. Those reserves are being depleted at an alarming rate in some regions and are badly polluted in many others,  warned experts last week at the International Groundwater Forum 2010 conference in Beijing. The scientists also warned that confronting the crisis will require dealing with other short - ages: of knowledge and regulation. They say that a nationwide network to monitor ground - water levels is urgently needed, and that the government should  improve data sharing, cut water waste and help farming become more efficient. “The water crisis is not unique to China,” says Frank  Schwartz, a hydrologist at Ohio State University in Columbus, who was  at the meeting. “But the problem here is orders of magnitude bigger  than anywhere else.” Groundwater is used to irrigate more than 40% of  China’s farmland, and for about 70% of the drinking water in the dry northern and northwestern regions. According to Opportunities and Challenges in the Chinese Groundwater Science, a 2009 report  sponsored by China’s National Natural Science Foundation and China  Geological Survey (CGS), part of the Ministry of Land and Resources  (MOLR), the past few decades have seen groundwater extraction  increasing by about 2.5 billion cubic metres per year to meet these needs. Consequently, groundwater levels of the arid North China Plain have dropped as fast as 1 metre a year between 1974 and 2000, forcing people to dig hundreds of metres to access fresh water, according to research presented by Bridget Scanlon, a hydrogeologist at the  University of Texas at Austin. Already, water is scarce for two-thirds of China’s 660 cities, according to a survey by the Ministry of Water Resources (MOWR). And as China’s economy expands, so will  its demand for water. The country will consume 750 billion cubic metres of water a year by 2030, about 90% of the total amount of usable water resources in the country, projects the MOWR. Read on.... You may also download the recent issue of the Quarterly Notes on Sustainable Water Management - Q02/2014.

2014-10-24

_moneytalks IV
How the Market Can Mitigate Water Shortages in the American West

-- a _kt75 | reprint

_NEW: explore all _kt75 | publications via the news db... and leave your comments here




The American West has a long tradition of conflict over water. But after fifteen years of drought across the region, it is no longer simply conflict: it is crisis. In the face of unprecedented declines in reservoir storage and groundwater reserves throughout the West, we focus in this discussion paper on a set of policies that could contribute to a lasting solution: using market forces to facilitate the movement of water resources and to mitigate the risk of water shortages. 
We begin by reviewing key dimensions of this problem: the challenges of population and economic growth, the environmental stresses from overuse of common water resources, the risk of increasing water-supply volatility, and the historical disjunction that has developed between and among rural and urban water users regarding the amount we consume and the price we pay for water. We then turn to five proposals to encourage the broader establishment and use of market institutions to encourage reallocation of water resources and to provide new tools for risk mitigation. Each of the five proposals offers a means of building
resilience into our water management systems. 
Many aspects of Western water law impose significant obstacles to water transactions that, given the substantial and diverse interests at stake, will take many years to reform. However, Western states can take an immediate step to enable more-flexible use of water resources by allowing simple, short-term water transactions. First, sensible water policy should allow someone who needs water to pay someone else to forgo her use of water or to invest in water conservation and, in return, to obtain access to the saved water. As a second step, state and local governments should facilitate these transactions by establishing essential market institutions, such as water banks, that can serve as brokers, clearinghouses, and facilitators of trade.
Third, water managers should support and encourage the use of market-driven risk management strategies to address growing variability and uncertainty in water supplies. These strategies include the use of dry-year options to provide for water sharing in the face of shortages, and water trusts to protect environmental values. New reservoir management strategies that allow for sophisticated, market-driven use of storage could build additional resilience into water distribution. 
Fourth, states should better regulate the use of groundwater to ensure sustainability and to bring groundwater under the umbrella of water trading opportunities. Groundwater reserves are an important environmental resource and provide strategic reserves against drought, but proper management of groundwater is also critical to the development of markets. Markets cannot work effectively if users can delay facing the realities of local water scarcity through the unsustainable use of an open-access resource.
Finally, strong federal leadership will be necessary to promote interstate and interagency cooperation in water management, as well as to coordinate essential state-level gathering of data on water supplies and water use. In particular, the Bureau of Reclamation of the U.S. Department of the Interior plays a central role in water projects across the West, and its actions will be essential in confronting the crisis. Read on...

Want to stay tuned? Sign up for the free _kt75 | first reader.

2014-10-23

_moneytalks III: water-quality trading may reduce river pollution
(study)

-- a _kt75 | reprint

_NEW: explore all _kt75 | publications via the news db... and leave your comments here








Allowing polluters to buy, sell or trade water-quality credits could significantly reduce pollution in river basins and estuaries faster and at lower cost than requiring the facilities to meet compliance costs on their own, a new Duke University-led study finds. The scale and type of the trading programs, though critical, may matter less than just getting them started. "Our analysis shows that water-quality trading of any kind can significantly lower the costs of achieving Clean Water Act goals," said Martin W. Doyle, professor of river science and policy at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment. "All other things being equal, regulators should allow trading to occur at the river basin scale as an appropriate first step. Larger spatial scales may be needed later if abatement costs increase," said Doyle, who also serves as director of the water policy program at Duke's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. The new study was published this month in the journal Water Resources Research. It comes at a time when regulators are debating the optimal scales and types of trading programs to reduce water pollution in some of the nation's largest and most troubled watershed systems, including the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which spans 64,000 square miles in parts of six states. In water-quality trading programs, facilities facing higher pollution control costs are allowed to meet their regulatory obligations by purchasing pollution reduction credits from other polluters in their trading market. The end result—improved water quality—is the same, but the time and money needed to achieve it is less. New programs are often delayed because regulators want to get as many things right up front as they can. Concerns include how big or small a trading market should be, whether it should include interstate trading, and whether it should be based on one-for-one trades or trading ratios. Getting these details right is vital, Doyle said, but it's also important not to let them bog down a program's launch. "Our research very clearly shows that while achieving an optimal scale is best, any approach will yield gains over no trading at all," he said. "So the point is to allow trading." To conduct their analysis, Doyle and his team developed a coupled hydrologic-economic model that measured the impacts of one-for-one trading and trading ratios among wastewater treatment plants in river basins draining into North Carolina's Albemarle-Pamlico Sound, the nation's second largest estuary. They assessed the pros and cons of each program type over the entire length of the basins, not just downriver or in the estuary. They also looked at how costs were affected when market scale was expanded from sub-basin to basin-wide, and then to a larger area that included adjacent basins extending into Virginia. "As the markets got larger, facilities had more opportunities to find suitably sized trading partners who could help them reduce compliance costs," Doyle said. "But as we exceeded the basin scale, we reached a tipping point where risks increased so that pollution from many sources could end up in just a few places, creating pollution hotspots." The study found only modest differences in the effectiveness of programs allowing one-for-one trading versus trading ratios. The optimal scales of markets remained the same under either scenario. Read on...


Want to stay tuned? Sign up for the free _kt75 | first reader.
Nature Blog Network
Blogtotal
Foxload
bloglist.de Deine moderierte Blogliste

Content

Contact me

Thanks for checking out my jQuery plugin, I hope you find this useful.

This can be a form to submit feedback, or contact info